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Johnson Cancer Research Center

K-State Cancer Research Student Makes Discovery About Post-Hemorrhage Immune System Response, Presents at National Meeting

Tuesday March 16, 2010

K-STATE STUDENT FINDS THAT THERAPEUTICS GIVEN TO TRAUMA PATIENTS MIGHT NOT BE EFFECTIVE WHEN A CERTAIN UNDIAGNOSED INFECTION IS PRESENT

A Kansas State University study aimed at alleviating intestinal damage in trauma patients digressed to an important finding that could affect medication given to the individuals.

Diana Hylton is a K-State senior in microbiology, nutritional sciences and pre-medicine and a 2006 graduate of Cair Paravel Latin School in Tecumseh. She is analyzing how the immune system is involved in damage to the intestines following hemorrhagic shock. While studying the effects of a complement inhibitor given following hemorrhage, she found that Helicobacter infection changes the body’s mechanistic response and would therefore affect the therapeutics given to trauma patients.

“The understanding of the different immune processes involved after hemorrhage suggests that the therapeutic potential of some drugs might not be effective on trauma patients with undiagnosed Helicobacter infections,” Hylton said.

Hylton is working with Sherry Fleming, assistant professor in the Division of Biology. Hylton’s project involves studying a mouse model of hemorrhage, which is associated with a sudden rapid loss of a significant amount of blood, and it is common in trauma patients. Hemorrhage causes intestinal damage, and the body responds by activating the complement system.

Read the whole article at K-State Media Relations